Maseno University Repository

Next priorities for intervention in Kenya: Results from a cohort study of drug use, HIV and HCV patterns in five urban areas

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author DM Ndetei, FA Ongecha, RM Malow, J Onyancha, V Mutiso, D Kokonya, L Khasakhala, G Odhiambo, R Rosenberg
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-29T08:43:00Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-29T08:43:00Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.maseno.ac.ke/handle/123456789/1692
dc.description.abstract In Kenya, alcohol, cigarettes, Khat (miraa) and cannabis sativa, have remained the most popular abused substance and have been linked to increasing rates of HIV/HCV . This study’s objective was to identify the types, frequency, and methods of substances used and their relationship to HIV and HCV seroprevalence among substance abusers in five representative Kenyan cities. Methods: Purposive and snow-ball sampling was used. Among 1420 substance abusers, psychosocial and substance use factors were assessed, with a subset of 120 tested for HIV and Hepatitis C Viral (HCV) infection. Results: In five Kenya cities, the highest oral daily consumption of the drugs was recorded in Malindi (83.3%) and Mombasa (56.6%). Snorting and sniffing was used on a daily basis mainly in Mombasa (85.0%) followed by Nakuru (72.7%) and Nairobi (70.6%). Malindi exclusively practiced injection of drugs on a daily basis with a one-day prevalence rate of 100.0%, followed by Mombasa (86.5 %) and Nairobi (67.9%). Across the five cities, the most prevalently substance abused was Alcohol (36.3%) followed by nicotine (17.5%), Cannabis sativa (9.9%), Heroin ( 8.0%), Khat whose active ingredient is Catha edulis (2.8%), and cocaine (2.2%) and the most popular route of intake was oral (45.7%), nasal (38.7%) and injection (10.4%). Of the 120 tested for HIV and HCV, approximately 61% were seropositive for Hepatitis C and 42% for HIV and 85% were Injection Drug Users (IDUs). Interestingly, of these IDUs, 49.5% tested positive for HIV and 70.29% tested positive for Hepatitis C (HepC). These results support a relationship between IDU behavior and HIV … en_US
dc.publisher University Of Nairobi en_US
dc.title Next priorities for intervention in Kenya: Results from a cohort study of drug use, HIV and HCV patterns in five urban areas en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Maseno University Repository


Browse

My Account