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Silent religiosity in a snivelling nation: the role of religious institutions in promoting post-conflict reconciliation in Kenya

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dc.contributor.author Susan M Kilonzo
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-25T08:13:08Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-25T08:13:08Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.uri https://repository.maseno.ac.ke/handle/123456789/2329
dc.description.abstract This article seeks to examine the role of religious institutions in peace building, prior to and after the 2007 post-elections violence in Kenya. The author builds an argument that supports the view that religious institutions have a role to play in peace building. Using Klopp’s (2002) conception about liberal versus illiberal nationalism, the author explains how religious institutions in Kenya can be a voice for the voiceless communities, especially during and after conflicts largely triggered by the political leaders in the country. The arguments presented bring to the forefront the role that religious institutions play in post-conflict situations to reconcile diverse ethnic communities, and offer some lessons learned about post-conflict peace communication. en_US
dc.subject Religious institutions, elections, post-conflict, ethnic cleansing en_US
dc.title Silent religiosity in a snivelling nation: the role of religious institutions in promoting post-conflict reconciliation in Kenya en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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